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Book review: The Trespasser by Tana French

The Trespasser (Dublin Murder Squad, #6)The Trespasser by Tana French

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I really enjoy Tana French’s Murder Squad series, and this installment is no exception.

Antoinette Conway and her partner Stephen Moran tackle their latest assignment, the murder of Aislinn Murray. It appears to be a slam-dunk the-boyfriend-did-it case, but the inconsistencies lurking around the edges keep hinting at another solution. Conway and Moran poke at the inconsistencies, start running into roadblocks, and begin to suspect corrupt cops and organized crime are somehow connected to the murder. Then the constant harrassment and pranks Conway suffers in the squad room lead her to believe her partner is sabotaging their case.

Antoinette Conway is a difficult character to like, and the whole Murder Squad comes off as an abusive dysfunctional unit. That makes this a rough read. But persevere. It’s worth it in the end.

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Book review: Faithful Place by Tana French

Faithful Place (Dublin Murder Squad, #3)Faithful Place by Tana French
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Tana French takes on Frank Mackey in her third outing with the Dublin Murder Squad. Mackey, as you may recall, is with the Undercover division of the Dublin police department, and takes his responsibilities as the coordinator of undercover operations and operatives very seriously. In Faithful Place, however, his work gets shunted aside as he is sucked back into his old neighborhood to deal with family drama and his own history.

At 19, Frank was prepared to run away to London with Rosie Daly, the love of his life, and together take the music world by storm. But she never appeared for their rendezvous and, although Frank himself left the neighborhood soon after, he never left Dublin. He never heard from Rosie again. Frank spent many years wondering where she was, imagining her life, while he married and had a child and divorced and built his career with the Dublin police, and eventually stopped wondering. Then one day, his sister calls to say the wreckers had found Rosie’s suitcase in an abandoned house on their street, and would he please come back home to help them decide what to do.

Frank, desperate to know what happened to Rosie, allows himself to be pulled back into the sick family dynamic he fled more than 20 years previously. And, try as he might against it, he easily falls into the old pattern of family interaction as if he’d never left. Ah, Irish guilt. Nothing like it. As he investigates the discovery of the suitcase and comes to a conclusion about what really happened to Rosie, Frank struggles also to deal with the legacy of his family and his neighborhood: the reputation, the history, the neighbors, the bad blood…so much bad blood.

With Faithful Place, Tana French again creates a taut mood and tight story, and three-dimensional characters who live and breathe and bleed and grieve. Wonderful stuff. I can’t wait for the next book.

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Book review: The Likeness by Tana French

The Likeness (Dublin Murder Squad, #2)The Likeness by Tana French
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

In an effort to discover a killer, Detective Cassie Maddox is put undercover after a young woman who bears her a stunning resemblance is discovered murdered. Said young woman was known as Alexandra Madison, or Lexie, the alias Cassie used in a drug sting operation some years prior. So who is she? And why was she stabbed and left to die in a tumbledown crofter’s cottage on a remote country lane?

Pleading amnesia as a result of the attack to cover any gaps in knowledge, Cassie takes Lexie’s place in a house shared by four other young people. She begins to live Lexie’s life: going to school, working on the house, fixing dinner, talking with her roommates — a life so ordinary and comfortable that Cassie’s boundaries start to blur.

I thought about her differently that night. Before, she had been an invader or a dare, always something that set my back stiffening and my adrenalin racing. But I was the one who had flashed into her life out of nowhere…I was the dare she had taken, years before the flip side of the coin landed in front of me. The moon spun slowly across the sky and I thought of my face blue-gray and empty on steel in the morgue, the long rush and clang of the drawer shutting her into the dark, alone. I imagined her sitting on this same bit of wall on other, lost nights, and I felt so warm and so solid, firm moving flesh overlaid on her faint silvery imprint, it almost broke my heart. I wanted to tell her things she should have known, how her tutorial group had coped with Beowulf and what the guys had made for dinner, what the sky looked like tonight; things I was keeping for her.

Tana French takes us deep into Cassie’s psyche, and by extension into Lexie’s, with heartbreaking prose and keen observation. Her phrasing is so sharp it cuts. She imbues her characters with grit, determination, bravado, so much sheer humanity…even the minor players have dimension. She gradually builds the tension and darkens the atmosphere — Lexie’s world isn’t so safe after all — but leaves us guessing about the killer until the very end. And even then, are we really sure what happened?

Well done. Very well done.

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