Tag Archive | myth

Book review: American Gods by Neil Gaiman

American GodsAmerican Gods by Neil Gaiman

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

2003 Review

Neil Gaiman is one of the most original writers currently publishing. He defies category: how does one classify an author whose work ranges from SF to horror to social commentary to parable and back, all within the pages of one book? His style is reminiscent of Clive Barker and Harlan Ellison, perhaps with a touch of Lovecraft thrown in for seasoning.

AMERICAN GODS tells the story of the war brewing between the “old” gods of the United States — the piskies and brownies and vrokolaks brought over from the Old Country by immigrant believers — and the “new” gods of technology and progress worshipped by the descendants of those immigrants. One human, an ex-con called Shadow, is enlisted by a man calling himself Wednesday to help unite the old gods in resisting the new. Shadow, at loose ends after the sudden loss of his wife, agrees to work for Wednesday, and is plunged headlong into intrigue and strangeness, where people are not who they appear, time does not track, and even the dead do not stay in their graves.

A haunting tone poem of a novel. Highly recommended.

2017 Re-read

Although I had been intending to re-read this book for years, the impending debut of the Starz series (April 30!) finally got this book down from the shelf and into my hands in mid-April.

Seasons of ReadingIt’s funny how time can distort the memory of a once-read novel. I remembered this story as being mostly a road trip with Shadow and Wednesday. While there is definitely a great deal of travel involved, I had completely forgotten the events that take place in sleepy, quiet, wintry Lakeside. I had also forgotten the outcome of Wednesday’s machinations, and how truly noble Shadow turns out to be.

Now I’m prepared for the TV show. It better not be awful.

2017SFFReadingChallenge(Side observation: I expect researching this novel is what eventually led Gaiman to write Norse Mythology.)

View all my reviews

Read as part of the Spring Into Horror read-a-thon.  This is the only book I managed to finish during the time frame.  Join us next time!

Also read for the 2017 Award Winning SF/F Challenge.  You can still join in on that one.

Save

Book review: Fated by S.G. Browne

FatedFated by S.G. Browne
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Did you know that various immortals watch us at every moment? They do, and they report to God, who prefers being called Jerry, by the way. But they’re not supposed to interfere with us humans. In fact, Rule Number One is Don’t Get Involved.

Fate, however, has broken Rule Number One. He’s fallen in love.

Fate, who prefers being called Fabio, has grown tired of watching all of us screw up and wander off the paths he assigned us when we were born. This creates new work for him, assigning us each new fates, which we proceed to blithely ignore as well. Jerry damn that free will thing. But every now and then, Fabio runs into an individual whose path he cannot see. And when he runs into Sara repeatedly — by Chance, at first, and then deliberately — he knows she’s on the Path of Destiny, and he can’t see her future, but that doesn’t matter. In fact, it makes her even more appealing….

And so, there goes Rule Number One. Which subsequently leads to breaking other rules, such as Rule Number Five, Never Materialize In Front Of Humans, followed closely by Rule Number Six, Never Dematerialize In Front Of Humans. And so forth.

But it’s when Fabio breaks Rule Number Two, Don’t Improve Anyone’s Assigned Future, that things really start to get hairy.

The thing about Destiny is she’s a nymphomaniac.
The thing about Lady Luck is she has ADD.
The thing about Jerry is he’s omnipotent. But busy.
The thing about Gossip is…well, you know.

And the thing about S.G. Browne is he’s following in Christopher Moore’s footsteps, and doing a bang-up job of it. Which is why I hadn’t even finished this book before I went out and bought his other title, Breathers.

Many thanks to LibraryThing‘s Early Reviewers Club for the opportunity to read this book.

View all my reviews